Greetings, loves. I didn’t get that video done last week. I’d like to say I’ll get it done this week, but I hate making promises I can’t keep. I’m busy these days. Busy with good, though. My plate is full but I feel like my heart is fuller. And in the theme of working hard to fill the heart (knowing that all good things come from within) I wrote a little diddy and I thought I’d share it with you…

 

Green grass is hardly worth yearning for.
Turn on the hose, the sprinkler,
toss a bucket out the window in a wide arc.
Hell, just be patient and wait for the rain to come.
(It will. Usually when you’ve planned to sunbathe.)

And then your grass will get greener.

But then that’s all you’ve got,
green
grass.

If you’ve ever turned your nose up
at the freshly finished McMansion
with carefully selected
Harmony Perennial Ryegrass Sod
laid straight to the cheap brick facade
and narry a flower yet to be planted to breathe
life and break up those harsh sterile lines

Then I don’t think green grass
is really what you’re looking for.

For one thing, the greener it is the faster it grows.
And the city won’t consider how diligently you’re
drowning this precious grass
when they issue you a fine because
its grown so long it’s blocking your windows
and overtaking the footpath
and your neighbors hardly have time to care
for their own lawns for all the time they spend
thinking and complaining
about how yours has become obnoxious.

Be honest, you really don’t want to sit
out in a yard so overgrown you can’t find
your patio furniture.

You have to cut the grass, dude.

And that might look better but if you were
to invest in trimming and neatening
the rough edges you’d be surprised to find
it actually looked kind of cruddy
before you did that extra work.

Sure, the mowed lawn was good enough
but you should know you deserve
better.
Your lawn deserves better.

And yes I must admit sometimes
the rain is too scarce and the water too precious
and sometimes these aren’t
enough on their own anyways
and you must fertilize this yard to get it green.

Sometimes it won’t be green.
Is it fair to love your grass less
when it has fallen
to the harsh blow
of the inevitable winter
that reliably comes and yet just as reliably
will go?

Remember that you don’t want this
grass to just be green.
You want to see yourself
in this space around your home.
Plant trees, bushes, shrubbery, flowers,
fruits, vegetables and vines.
Build a gazebo,
decorate the patio,
make an archway,
find and re-finish an antique garden bench,
hang a swing.

Probably not all of those things
because not all of those things really speak to you
and you and I both know you don’t have the time
to invest in creating or maintaining
all of them
nor do you probably have the space
but make the space for the things you want
in your place.

Oh, and not all that is green is good.
Most weeds are green.
Some are harmless, only considered
weeds by popular opinion,
and you don’t necessarily need to take
the opinions of others into consideration.
This is your grass.
But some weeds will choke out everything else
and destroy everything you’ve worked
and wanted so hard for.

Pull out the weeds that harm and displease you.
Take the time to get the whole root.
Dig them out.
Don’t take to shortcuts and chemicals right off the bat
or just snap off the heads,
you need to get all that shit out and you
probably need not lay hazardous waste to do so.

It won’t be easy.
Some of those weeds have grown deeper
than you would think they could or should.
But the space made when they are gone
offers room for new growth.

I must confess I hate yard work.
I would rather wash my hands of it all,
hiring it done
or simply picking up and moving to
a high rise condo where I can set
a single plastic plant on the balcony
and call it good.
I resist this work
like most resist the dentist and the gym,
but I find that once the discomfort
and the labor are faced that
the results are worth the uncertainty and torment
of the toiling that seems endless when beginning.

The satisfaction in seeing the progress
(not the completion, mind you,
this work is never complete,
as complete would indicate finished,
and if it were finished we could not
change or improve it)
is perhaps sweeter than the time spent
sitting peacefully in this beautiful thing
born of the labor of your hands and heart.

Cheers, yo.
xx April

This is the selfie I took in the sweaty satisfaction of mowing my lawn for the very first time. I had never used a lawn mower before and was only comfortable maneuvering a manual one and of course I started off with grass tall enough to hide the dog. Taking this picture felt awesome.